MLF - Military Logistics

US Army looks to recapitalise more HEMTTs

8th February 2019 - 13:25 GMT | by The Shephard News Team in Oshkosh

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On 7 February 2019 the US announced four more contracts with Oshkosh Defense for recapitalised Heavy Expanded Mobility Tactical Trucks (HEMTT). These contracts total $233 million, with the work to be carried out at Oshkosh itself, with a scheduled completion by the end of 2020.

Two of the contracts also included Palletised Load System (PLS) trucks, and new PLS trailers. In each case, one bid was solicited with one bid received.

The HEMTT is a eight-wheel drive, diesel powered tactical truck weighing in at just under 10t, the vehicles were first manufactured in 1982. Current models (carrying the prefix A4) feature an EPA 2004 compliant Caterpillar (CAT) C-15 six-cylinder, 15.2 litre diesel engine, capable of a peak of 515 hp. The A4 models are also fitted with an Allison 4500SP 5F/1R automatic transmission and an updated version of Oshkosh’s 25,000 kg (55,000 lbs) two-speed transfer case.

Used extensively by the US Army to provide heavy transport capabilities, Oshkosh has recapitalised over 13,000 of the heavy vehicles in similar contracts since 1995.

In early 2015, it was estimated that over 27,000 HEMTTs had been produced, whether through new-build or re-manufacture. Though utilised by the US at first, HEMTTs are operated by a number of nations, including Egypt, Israel, Qatar and South Korea. 

'As the backbone of the US Army’s resupply and distribution system, the HEMTT and PLS vehicles are heavily relied on to carry munitions and other critical supplies across all types of terrains and in all types of environments,' said Pat Williams, VP and general manager of US Army and Marine Corps Programmes for Oshkosh Defense. 

'We are proud that the US Army has trusted Oshkosh to provide this cost-effective recapitalisation service for over two decades,' Williams continued. 'As the original equipment manufacturer, we know these vehicles inside and out, and we are in the best position to quickly return them to field operations in like-new condition.'

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