MTSN - Training/Simulation

Sikorsky conducts HH-60W training systems CDR

27th October 2017 - 15:30 GMT | by The Shephard News Team

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Sikorsky has successfully conducted the critical design review (CDR) of HH-60W Combat Rescue Helicopter (CRH) programme training systems, Lockheed Martin announced on 25 October.

This prepares the programme to proceed to assembly, test, and evaluation of the HH-60W helicopter’s training systems.

The USAF is seeking 112 helicopters to replace its HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopters, which perform combat search and rescue operations as well as personnel recovery for all US military services.

Under a $1.5 billion engineering manufacturing and development contract Sikorsky is developing and integrating the CRH and mission systems. This includes delivery of nine HH-60W helicopters as well as six aircrew and maintenance training devices and instructional courseware.

The training devices include full motion simulators, full aircraft maintenance trainers and part task training devices for aircraft systems such as avionics, rescue hoist and landing gear.

The flight simulators will have the capability to link with other simulators on the Combat Air Forces Distributed Mission Operations network. The flight simulators will be used to train the full aircrew allowing pilots and special mission aviators to train together.

Avionics desk-top trainers will have an array of touch screens mimicking the glass cockpit and will include the ability to learn aircraft systems troubleshooting while in a classroom or squadron environment.The part task training devices are intended to train maintenance personnel and to provide hands-on training in operations, servicing, inspection, and component removal and installation.

The instructional courseware will provide interactive instruction and computer-based training for HH-60W maintainers and operators.

First flight of the HH-60W aircraft is expected in late 2018. Training devices and courseware are expected to be ready for training in early 2020.

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