Naval Warfare

Naval Warfare magazine: undersea threats, aircraft carriers and more

13th November 2020 - 09:30 GMT | by The Shephard News Team

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What's inside this edition:

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While naval forces have shown themselves capable of adapting to the unique operational challenges of 2020, the effect of a global pandemic on future strategies and procurements is yet to be felt.

 

Features include:

A VISIBLE DETERRENT

Maritime power projection has undoubtedly relied heavily on aircraft carriers. Can the new Gerald R Ford class help the USN stay one step ahead of its adversaries looking to upset the balance of power?

Other features include:

CLARITY IN CROWDED WATERS

With a broad range of underwater threats facing naval vessels, from armed divers to nuclear submarines, the array of detection technologies available is more important than ever.

DEVIOUS TACTICS

As China tries to exert control over international waters, tensions in the South China Sea keep rising.

COSTLY KILLERS

Expensive to procure and maintain, conventional diesel-electric attack submarines offer operational advantages that come with a hefty price tag. As new-build programmes remain out of reach for navies with limited budgets, several countries are looking to modernise their existing fleets.

PROTRACTED PROGRESS

While the Russian military has clear ambitions to equip its surface fleet with state-of-the-art air defence systems to sit at the heart of anti-access/area denial zones, technical development issues and a glacial pace of shipbuilding and refurbishment could confound these efforts.

SUPPORTING SUSTAINMENT

The British government resuscitated the Future Solid Support Ship programme in September, boosting hopes that the project might be open to bids in the coming months after a year-long delay.

FASTER AND MORE FURIOUS

High-speed patrol craft are increasingly finding themselves in the inventories of navies, and with more potent armament than their coastguard counterparts.

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