Air Warfare

Air Warfare: emerging threats, critical care, US Army Aviation and more

9th April 2020 - 15:38 GMT | by The Shephard News Team

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What's inside this edition:

COMMENT

As the COVID-19 pandemic wreaks havoc on human lives and the global economy, the defence industry continues to contribute to battling the crisis.

 

Features include:

RISK ASSESSMENT

As the aerial battlespace evolves, platforms and networks face the prospect of a fresh threat spectrum that goes beyond traditional kinetic weapons and EW effectors.

 

STAYING SAFE

The ways in which attack helicopters and their associated weapons management systems play a role in contested environments has become a highly topical issue. Shephard looks at all sides of the argument.

 

Other features include:

CONTROLLED AGGRESSION

As a long-term proponent of dissimilar air combat training, the US military is looking to enhance both its organic capability and increase the scope of contracted services.

SOLID SUPPORT

As the contemporary operating environment demands more of SOF, special operations aircraft look set to continue to be heavily relied upon to support air, ground and maritime missions with an ever-increasing range of capabilities.

FLEXIBLE WORKING

The challenge for future airborne communications lies in ensuring network robustness while maintaining the capability to cater for the broadest variety of platforms, devices and protocols.

VERTICAL RESUPPLY

The US Army’s FVL programme promises new helicopters with increased speed and range, but as budgets tighten, will these aircraft deliver much-needed capability or fall victim to age-old and future threats?

PERSISTENT PROGRESSION

Evolving from stovepiped ISR assets to network-enabled multi-capability platforms, TUAVs have come a long way since their inception, and future developments could see a further significant shift in their application.

GOOD AT NETWORKING

Managing an air battle is far from simple, especially when enemy forces are disrupting C2 by jamming radio communications.

 

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