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PARIS 2009: Bombardier updates CRJ1000 progress

14th June 2009 - 14:01 GMT | by The Shephard News Team

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Following its announcement of new orders for the CRJ1000 from Air Nostrum, Bombardier has reported the latest on the testing and production of the aircraft.

“We continue to make strong progress, including the addition of the second production model,” commented Ben Boehm, vice-president, programs, Bombardier Commercial Aircraft.

Wing-to-fuselage mating for the first production CRJ1000 NextGen, S/N 19001, is complete and the aircraft has been transferred to the pre-flight hangar at Bombardier’s Mirabel, Quebec facilities. Installation of the cabin interior as well as exterior painting is complete, and the aircraft is now in the final stage of preparation for flight. The fuselage barrel for this aircraft arrived at Mirabel on 16 January 2009 from Bombardier Aerospace’s Belfast site in Northern Ireland.

After its maiden flight at Mirabel, S/N 19001 will be flown to the Bombardier Flight Test Center in Wichita, KS, where it will join the prototype CRJ1000, S/N 19991, in the flight test and functional and reliability testing programmes.

S/N 19991, which first flew on 3 September 2008, had completed over 450 flight test hours by the end of May 2009, just over 50% of the estimated total flight test hours required for the programme. Transport Canada has seen and reviewed the prototype aircraft and the agency’s pilots have had opportunities to fly the aircraft.

Bombardier says this prototype has met or exceeded published speeds and altitudes, and flutter tests have been successfully accomplished. Flights into natural icing conditions have also been successfully completed. The aircraft weight is on target.

The second production model, S/N 19002, is now on the assembly line.

The CRJ1000 NextGen simulator programme is on track and will be certified in July 2009.

Transport Canada has approved the escalation of "C" check (heavy maintenance) intervals for the type to 6,000 flight hours, or approximately three years of airline service, thereby reducing maintenance costs for operators.

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